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American Academy of Sleep Medicine 

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  • Teen video contest promotes sleep awareness

    Jan 13 2015...
    High school students have one more month to enter the 2015 Sleep Story Video Contest. Sponsored by the American Sleep Medicine Foundation, the contest invites teens to make a creative video about the importance of sleep. Up for grabs is a grand prize of $1,000 – split evenly between the winning student and his or her school. Second and third-place prizes of $500 and $250 also will be awarded.

    Video entries must be between 30 seconds and 2 minutes in length. Entries must be received by Feb. 9, 2015. Jack Gentempo, a homeschool student from Norway, Maine, won the 2014 grand prize with his video, “The Wonderful World of Sleep.” READ MORE>>
  • Teens with earlier school start times have higher crash rates

    Nov 28 2014...
    A new study suggests that teen drivers who start class earlier in the morning are involved in more car accidents than peers with a later school start time.

    The study analyzed data from the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles. It compared teen crash rates in two nearby counties during two school years. One county had a high school start time of 7:20 a.m. Classes in the other county began at 8:45 a.m. READ MORE>>
  • Five sleep tips for parents of tired teens

    Aug 27 2014...
    The summertime sleep habits of most teens today would be enough to make Ben Franklin blow a proverbial fuse. A 3 a.m. to Noon sleep schedule isn’t likely to meet his standard of “early to bed, early to rise.” But it can be the norm for night-owl teens when they are free from a school schedule.

    As teens go back to school for the fall, Ben will get his revenge each morning when the alarm clock sounds. These early morning wake-up calls will leave most teens short on sleep during the school week. Here are five tips from the AASM to help parents promote healthy sleep in teens. READ MORE>>
  • Back to school sleep tips for kids

    Aug 11 2014...
    For kids, the long summer of sleeping in, staying up late and enjoying leisurely mornings is coming to a rapid close. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) offers tips to help parents adjust their children’s sleep schedules for both success in school and to promote a healthy lifestyle. READ MORE>>
  • Most U.S. teens are still losing sleep

    Jun 16 2014...
    New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms what most high school teachers already know: U.S. teens aren’t getting enough sleep.

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends that teens get a little more than nine hours of nightly sleep for optimal health and daytime alertness. But CDC data show that only 31.7 percent of high school students report sleeping at least eight hours on a typical school night. Clearly, American teens are failing to make the grade when it comes to their sleep. READ MORE>>
  • Night owls face disadvantages in high school years

    Nov 13 2013...
    Teenagers who stay up late during the school year are likely to have lower grades and more emotional problems than their morning lark counterparts, according to a study that looked at the long-term sleep habits of teens.

    The study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health involved a large sample of teens from across the country. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley looked at the teens’ academic records and reported bedtimes throughout their middle and high school years.

    About 30 percent of the teens had bedtimes later than 11:30 p.m. on school days and 1:30 a.m. in the summertime. This group was unable to meet their recommended 9 hours of sleep during the school year. As a result, these teens had lower GPA scores than their peers and more reported behavioral problems. READ MORE>>
  • A high school student's "Sleep Story"

    Oct 04 2013...
    The American Sleep Medicine Foundation recently challenged high school students around the country to create a video sleep story. A few dozen aspiring scientists and filmmakers answered their call, submitting documentaries, dramas and other creative takes on sleep topics. A panel of sleep physicians and researchers had the challenging job of narrowing the field down to a winning and several runners-up. 

    Congratulations to Jasper Lown, of Wheaton-Warrenville South High School for winning the 2013 ASMF Sleep Story Video Contest with this video: 

  • Increased sleep could reduce rate of adolescent obesity

    Apr 09 2013...
    Increasing the number of hours of sleep adolescents get each night may reduce the prevalence of adolescent obesity, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Results of the study show that fewer hours of sleep is associated with greater increases in adolescent body mass index (BMI) for participants between 14 and 18-years-old. The findings suggest that increasing sleep duration to 10 hours per day, especially for those in the upper half of the BMI distribution, could help to reduce the prevalence of adolescent obesity.

    Full results of the study are available online in the latest issue of Pediatrics. Previous studies have shown that a correlation exists between short sleep and obesity, but until now few have been able to rule out other variables such as time spent watching television and being physically active. READ MORE>>
  • Is TV part of your child’s bedtime routine?

    Jan 16 2013...
    A new study examined the “screen time” before bedtime of children and teens. This is the amount of time spent on the computer, watching TV or playing video games. READ MORE>>
  • Increasing teen’s sleep could lower diabetes risk

    Nov 15 2012...
    A new study of 245 healthy high school students suggest that increasing the amount of sleep that teenagers get could improve their insulin resistance and prevent the future onset of diabetes.

    Results indicate that higher insulin resistance is associated with shorter sleep duration regardless of race, age, gender, waist size and body mass index READ MORE>>