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News

  • Poor sleep tied to lower physical activity in people with PTSD

    Jul 21 2014...
    A new study suggests that poor sleep quality predicts lower physical activity in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    “We found that sleep quality was more strongly associated with physical activity one year later than was having a diagnosis of PTSD,” said lead author Lisa Talbot, postdoctoral fellow at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco. “The longitudinal aspect of this study suggests that sleep may influence physical activity.” READ MORE>>
  • Interruptions, fragmented sleep may be same as barely any sleep

    Jul 15 2014...
    When parents of infant children talk about their lives, you’ll hear words like “exhausting” or “hellish” nearly as often as “miraculous” and “life changing.” New parents have notoriously disturbed sleep. Whether the crying is for a feeding, a diaper change or nothing at all, the result is always the same: fragmented sleep.

    The price of multiple night waking is the same as staying up nearly the entire night. Scientifically speaking, the negative cognitive impact, shortened attention span and poor moods are equivalent to no more than four consecutive hours of sleep.

    It’s hard to blame them for having mixed feelings about parenting. They often wake up in the morning feeling more tired than the night before. READ MORE>>
  • Short sleep linked to aging brain

    Jul 02 2014...
    A new study finds that the less older adults sleep, the faster their brains age.

    Results show that each hour of reduced sleep duration changed the annual expansion rate of the ventricles by 0.59 percent. Ventricles are the internal chambers of the brain. Their expansion is a reliable marker for the risk of cognitive impairment. The study also found that reduced sleep sped up the annual decline rate in cognitive performance by 0.67 percent. READ MORE>>
  • Marijuana use can affect sleep quality

    Jun 11 2014...
    A new study suggests that marijuana use is associated with impaired sleep quality.

    Results show that any history of cannabis use was associated with an increased likelihood of reporting difficulty falling asleep and struggling to maintain sleep. Participants also reported experiencing non-restorative sleep and feeling daytime sleepiness. READ MORE>>
  • Late afternoon and early evening caffeine can disrupt sleep

    Nov 15 2013...
    That extra afternoon jolt of caffeine may be responsible for your tossing and turning at night. New research looked at caffeine’s effects on sleep taken 0, 3, or 6 hours before going to bed.

    The study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine involved 12 healthy normal sleepers. Researchers at Henry Ford Hospital and Wayne State University in Detroit looked at the effects of a given dose of caffeine taken at different times before sleep. READ MORE>>
  • Fall time change and how to adjust your sleep for the winter

    Oct 30 2013...
    Most of the United States will “fall back” to standard time on Sunday, November 3, at 2 a.m. Most people associate the fall time change with an extra hour of sleep followed by shorter days with earlier sunsets.

    Sleep physicians see the end of daylight saving time as a possible conflict between your body’s circadian rhythms and the expectations of society. READ MORE>>
  • Sleep quality may impact skin

    Jul 24 2013...
    The key to women looking younger might not be using a super expensive anti-aging cream, it may be just getting more shut eye. In a recent clinical trial, physician-scientists at University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center found that sleep quality impacts skin function and aging. The study, commissioned by Estée Lauder, demonstrated that poor sleepers had increased signs of skin aging and slower recovery from a variety of environmental stressors, such as disruption of the skin barrier or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Poor sleepers also had worse assessment of their own skin and facial appearance.

    The research team, led by Primary Investigator Elma Baron, MD, presented their data this spring at the International Investigative Dermatology Meeting in Edinburgh, Scotland in an abstract titled "Effects of Sleep Quality on Skin Aging and Function." READ MORE>>
  • Getting enough sleep could affect concussion test accuracy

    Jul 17 2013...
    August will be here in a couple of weeks and you know what that means — the start of both high school and college football seasons. And along with football season comes the increased risk of getting a concussion. A new study out of Vanderbilt University found that athletes who didn’t get enough sleep the night before undergoing baseline concussion testing didn’t perform as well as expected.

    "Our results indicate athletes sleeping less than 7 hours the night prior to baseline concussion testing did not do as well on 3 out of 4 ImPACT scores and showed more symptoms," said lead author, Jake McClure, MD from Vanderbilt University. "Because return-to-play decisions often hinge on the comparison of post-concussion to baseline concussion scores, our research indicates that healthcare providers should consider the sleep duration prior to baseline neurocognitive testing as a potential factor in assessing recovery." READ MORE>>
  • Late bedtimes may lead to extra calories and weight gain

    Jul 05 2013...
    Here’s a finding that will make you reconsider your bedtime: the later you stay awake, the more likely you are to lose sleep, eat more calories and ultimately gain weight. It’s a no win proposition for night owls, who already have the odds of having a successful career stacked against them.

    Penn researchers discovered the relationship between late-night bedtimes, eating habits and weight gain in a study that appeared in the July issue of journal SLEEP, an online scientific journal co-published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

    Men with sleep loss, they found gained more weight than women, and African Americans were especially vulnerable to the effects of sleep loss. READ MORE>>
  • Stay safe this Independence Day and avoid drowsy driving

    Jul 03 2013...
    AAA Travel is projecting that 40.8 million Americans will travel 50 miles or more from home during the Independence Day holiday, with 84 percent of travelers planning to travel by automobile. According to a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, an estimated 16.5 percent of all fatal motor vehicle crashes in the United States from 1999 to 2008 involved a fatigued driver.

    Fatigue affects everyone and can be defined as the state of exhaustion or tiredness associated with activity, exertion, working too many hours in a row, staying up too many hours in a row or a lack of sleep. READ MORE>>