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News

  • Late afternoon and early evening caffeine can disrupt sleep

    Nov 15 2013...
    That extra afternoon jolt of caffeine may be responsible for your tossing and turning at night. New research looked at caffeine’s effects on sleep taken 0, 3, or 6 hours before going to bed.

    The study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine involved 12 healthy normal sleepers. Researchers at Henry Ford Hospital and Wayne State University in Detroit looked at the effects of a given dose of caffeine taken at different times before sleep. READ MORE>>
  • Fall time change and how to adjust your sleep for the winter

    Oct 30 2013...
    Most of the United States will “fall back” to standard time on Sunday, November 3, at 2 a.m. Most people associate the fall time change with an extra hour of sleep followed by shorter days with earlier sunsets.

    Sleep physicians see the end of daylight saving time as a possible conflict between your body’s circadian rhythms and the expectations of society. READ MORE>>
  • Sleep quality may impact skin

    Jul 24 2013...
    The key to women looking younger might not be using a super expensive anti-aging cream, it may be just getting more shut eye. In a recent clinical trial, physician-scientists at University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center found that sleep quality impacts skin function and aging. The study, commissioned by Estée Lauder, demonstrated that poor sleepers had increased signs of skin aging and slower recovery from a variety of environmental stressors, such as disruption of the skin barrier or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Poor sleepers also had worse assessment of their own skin and facial appearance.

    The research team, led by Primary Investigator Elma Baron, MD, presented their data this spring at the International Investigative Dermatology Meeting in Edinburgh, Scotland in an abstract titled "Effects of Sleep Quality on Skin Aging and Function." READ MORE>>
  • Getting enough sleep could affect concussion test accuracy

    Jul 17 2013...
    August will be here in a couple of weeks and you know what that means — the start of both high school and college football seasons. And along with football season comes the increased risk of getting a concussion. A new study out of Vanderbilt University found that athletes who didn’t get enough sleep the night before undergoing baseline concussion testing didn’t perform as well as expected.

    "Our results indicate athletes sleeping less than 7 hours the night prior to baseline concussion testing did not do as well on 3 out of 4 ImPACT scores and showed more symptoms," said lead author, Jake McClure, MD from Vanderbilt University. "Because return-to-play decisions often hinge on the comparison of post-concussion to baseline concussion scores, our research indicates that healthcare providers should consider the sleep duration prior to baseline neurocognitive testing as a potential factor in assessing recovery." READ MORE>>
  • Late bedtimes may lead to extra calories and weight gain

    Jul 05 2013...
    Here’s a finding that will make you reconsider your bedtime: the later you stay awake, the more likely you are to lose sleep, eat more calories and ultimately gain weight. It’s a no win proposition for night owls, who already have the odds of having a successful career stacked against them.

    Penn researchers discovered the relationship between late-night bedtimes, eating habits and weight gain in a study that appeared in the July issue of journal SLEEP, an online scientific journal co-published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

    Men with sleep loss, they found gained more weight than women, and African Americans were especially vulnerable to the effects of sleep loss. READ MORE>>
  • Stay safe this Independence Day and avoid drowsy driving

    Jul 03 2013...
    AAA Travel is projecting that 40.8 million Americans will travel 50 miles or more from home during the Independence Day holiday, with 84 percent of travelers planning to travel by automobile. According to a recent study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, an estimated 16.5 percent of all fatal motor vehicle crashes in the United States from 1999 to 2008 involved a fatigued driver.

    Fatigue affects everyone and can be defined as the state of exhaustion or tiredness associated with activity, exertion, working too many hours in a row, staying up too many hours in a row or a lack of sleep. READ MORE>>
  • Can’t sleep? Do this, not that!

    Jun 28 2013...
    One of the first things sleep physicians tell insomnia patients is to get out of bed if you can’t sleep. The worst thing you can do when you can’t fall asleep is lie in bed and attempt to force yourself to sleep. But you can’t do anything that’s stimulating or in violation of the basic rules of sleep hygiene. So what do you do? READ MORE>>
  • Sleep deprived men misjudge women’s interest

    Jun 18 2013...
    A new study suggests that one night of sleep deprivation leads to an increase in men’s perceptions of both women’s interest in and intent to have sex.

    “Our findings here are similar to those from studies using alcohol, which similarly inhibits the frontal lobe,” said co-principal investigator Jennifer Peszka, PhD, associate professor of psychology at Hendrix College in Conway, Ark., who led the study along with her colleague Jennifer Penner, PhD. READ MORE>>
  • Study links diet with daytime sleepiness in healthy adults

    May 28 2013...
    A new study suggests that your level of sleepiness or alertness during the day may be related to the type of food that you eat.

    “Increased fat consumption has an acute adverse effect on alertness of otherwise healthy, non-obese adults,” said principal investigator Alexandros Vgontzas, MD, professor of psychiatry at the Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, Pa. READ MORE>>
  • Sleeping after a trauma

    Apr 24 2013...
    The individuals who were affected by the Boston Marathon bombing tragedy on April 15 are facing what could be a long, hard road to recovery. This process can involve a struggle to sleep well.

    Many people develop what doctors call “acute stress disorder” after a terrifying event. This can occur even in people who only hear about danger or harm that a close friend or relative experienced. READ MORE>>