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News

  • Fall back to an earlier bedtime as daylight saving time ends

    Oct 31 2014...
    The end of daylight saving time on the first Sunday in November is the perfect time to make healthy sleep a priority. The time change arrives when it is already getting dark earlier in the evening. Setting the clock back an hour provides the ideal opportunity for sleep-deprived adults to adopt an earlier bedtime.

    Are you getting at least seven hours of nightly sleep? If not, then you can benefit from an earlier bedtime. Here are some tips to take advantage of the fall time change. READ MORE>>
  • Time change: raising insomnia awareness on nation’s most sleep deprived day

    Mar 06 2014...
    The national rate of car accidents, heart attacks and lost workplace productivity may spike Monday, coinciding with the first weekday following the “spring forward” time change. As we enter the final weeks of winter, we look forward to the extra hour of evening sunlight that the return to daylight saving time brings, at the expense of an hour of weekend sleep. “Black Monday” brings a shock to the nation’s circadian system as millions of Americans experience acute insomnia from the time change.

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine is using this particularly difficult Monday to help raise awareness of insomnia. The AASM is declaring March 10 as Insomnia Awareness Day to remind people with insomnia that help is available at a local AASM accredited sleep center. READ MORE>>
  • Fall time change and how to adjust your sleep for the winter

    Oct 30 2013...
    Most of the United States will “fall back” to standard time on Sunday, November 3, at 2 a.m. Most people associate the fall time change with an extra hour of sleep followed by shorter days with earlier sunsets.

    Sleep physicians see the end of daylight saving time as a possible conflict between your body’s circadian rhythms and the expectations of society. READ MORE>>
  • Why accidents increase after spring forward to daylight savings

    Mar 11 2013...
    Was traffic noticeably slower on your morning commute? If so, blame daylight saving time. The “spring forward” is believed to cause a temporary spike in traffic incidents. A 1998 Canadian study found that auto accidents may increase as much as 17 percent immediately following the time change.

    The authors of the Canadian study argue drowsy driving – rather than the other two factors – is why the frequency of accidents escalates after the time change. The study found the only significant increase in accidents occurred during the afternoon commute. That finding appears to rule out an early sunrise or forgetfulness as the reason for an increase in accidents. READ MORE>>
  • Adjust sleep schedule to minimize effect of daylight saving time

    Mar 07 2013...
    This weekend marks the return of daylight saving time (DST) for most of the United States. To help ensure a smooth transition to the new time, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) recommends that you begin to adjust your sleep schedule a few days prior to the beginning of DST.

    AASM spokesperson Ron Kramer, MD, with Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., says the return of DST is a good time to examine your individual sleep pattern. Along with diet and exercise, sleep is one of keys to maximize your health. READ MORE>>
  • Keep your sleep in check with the time change

    Nov 01 2012...
    While the "fall back" time change provides an extra hour of sleep, it can also have a negative impact on your circadian rhythm. There are ways to prepare and minimize the effects on your body.

    The end of daylight savings time on Sunday, November 4, means more than just turning your clocks back one hour. If you’re not careful, that one hour difference can throw off your circadian rhythms, or your internal clock that helps to regulate your 24-hour sleep-wake cycle. READ MORE>>